The Little Bay Tree • Franklyn + Vincent
Franklyn & Vincent is a few casual peeks from my kitchen garden beginnings and home maker dreams in a small terrace house in East London.
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The Little Bay Tree

26 Jan The Little Bay Tree

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In my folks old home we used to have a huge bay tree outside the kitchen window, so I’ve never actually bought a bay leaf. I know, spoilt eh!

So when my mum moved out she gave me a lovely terracotta pot from the old garden and I knew immediately I was going to put a little bay tree in it, to have my own small reminder of the old garden. Plus, I was used to not buying bay leaves, so seemed like a good investment.

As my small garden is mostly saved for edibles, it’s fair to say that in the winter it doesn’t look like much. There might be the last of the frosty kale, but as autumn closes, we’re all pretty much waiting for spring. Which makes me even more grateful for the green leaves of the bay tree in January.

It’s no Lada Gaga. My bay tree requires very little attention and won’t knock you out with any seasonal show-stopping performances, as pretty much looks exactly the same all year round.  But, I praise my bay tree for its patience and quiet reliability, amongst all the flighty, needy veg. Plus, its leaves can make wintry dishes like fish pie and dauphinoise potatoes taste the nuts.

So this is a shout-out to the quiet, modest guys in the garden and why my bay tree is this winter’s super low-maintenance, evergreen garden hero.

 
Star

“There are two seasonal diversions that can ease the bite of any winter.
One is the January thaw.  The other is the seed catalogues.”

Hal Borland

icon-Chilli

Dreaming of spring...
A date with the Barbican Conservatory
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